Deleuze003 德勒茲

Deleuze003b 德勒茲

Love Is For Other People 愛是為了別人

By James Brusseau

Translated by Springhero 雄伯

32hsiung@pchome.com.tw

 

    …and, for that part which remains rebellious, to repress it as deeply as possible, to shut it up in a cavern at the bottom of the ocean—such is the aim of Platonism in its will to bring about the triumph of icons over simulacra

                                    —Gilles Deleuze, Logic of Sense

 

     就反叛的部份而言,儘可能地壓制,囚禁於海底的洞穴,這就是柏拉圖理念的目的,這樣才能導致偶像戰勝虛擬。

                                    德勒茲,意義的邏輯

 

      Isabelle Eberhardt: born, Geneva, 1877, died twenty-seven years later, Algeria. She filled the years between with a wretched existence of malnutrition and aimless desert, Arabic culture. Through it all, she wrote. Her notes, journals, newspaper and magazine articles, short stories, and unfinished novels provide historians with elaborate accounts of North Africa during French colonialism. They also exemplify existence on Deleuze’s surface. Her life slips into the transience of insubstantial being. Her temporality denies continuity. The localities she establishes diverge in bursts. Alienation invests her relations to others and herself. This chapter documents those alienations, alienations that exist solely in Deleuze’s world, alienations that put the lie to Socrates.

 

     1877年,伊莎貝拉、耶帛哈誕生於日內瓦,二十七年後死於阿爾及利亞。她終其一生,悲慘地生活於貧瘠及無目標的沙漠中。在這樣的歲月中,她孜孜寫作。她的筆記、日誌、和雜誌上的文章、短篇小說,及未完成的長篇故事,提供法國殖民時期,北非屬地的詳細描述給歷史學家。他們也可以用來當著印證哲學家德勒茲所謂浮面存在的例子。她的生活像是虛無飄渺的瞬間。她的短暫一生無以為繼。她建立的個別性光芒四射。她跟別人及自己的關係充滿了疏離。本章整理這些疏離,也就是只存在於德勒茲世界的疏離,對蘇格拉底是道地謊言的疏離。

 

                   Women of the Scar 疤痕的女人

 

   At the age of twenty-three Eberhardt wrote this imperative into her journal: “ Lead two lives, one that…belongs to the desert, and one, calm and restful, devoted to thought and far from all that might interfere with it.” This resonates with her kind of time. Moments divorce each other. One minute no longer needs to stick with the previous. Her short story Blue Jacket carries the same temporal structure. The protagonist, a young Arab conscript guarded with pride the scars across his powerful chest and biceps—scars made by knives and stones, and even by firearms—the result of women he no longer remembered.

 

   二十三歲時,耶帛哈在她的日誌中寫下這樣的命令:「過雙重生活,一種屬於沙漠,另一種平靜和安詳,專注於思想,避開任何可能的擾亂。」這個命令迴響於她一生的時光。每個時刻分崩離析,每一分鐘不再跟前一分鐘有所關連。她的短篇小說「藍夾克」結構上也同樣簡短。主人翁是一位年輕的阿拉伯士兵,自負地悍衛他強健的胸膛及膂力。那裡充滿了刀劍、石頭、甚至槍火所造成的疤痕,那是他已經不再記得的無數女人所賦加的。

 

   The conscript cannot remember. But if time runs straight through in the mode of depth—as a chain of resembling moments—then the scars never escape their physical origin. This kind of time disallows the conscript’s forgetting, or allows it in only a limited sense because forgetting cannot mean cutting an episode clean away; pervasive resemblance cannot be interrupted. This forgetting operates only imperfectly by erecting a mental boundary to enclose the section marked for oblivion. The boundary remains as its own scar of the deletion: you may not remember , but you vaguely remember something you are not remembering. Reading the way Eberhardt demands, however, for her own life and her own writings—reading on the surface and through a time absolved of continuity from one moment to the next—these scars cease all memorial functioning. The past is no longer covered over, it is sliced away. Forgetting succeeds. It succeeds absolutely, just as it did for Rousseau’s savage erasing every past night so completely that he sold his bed every morning. The story Blue Jacket requires this wild forgetting, one incompatible with resembling moments. Consequently, Socrates cannot fully appreciate Eberhardt’s story. But Deleuze can.

 

   這位士兵記不得。但是假如時光是直接由淺通往深,就像是類似事物的鎖鏈,那麼這些疤痕何時出現在身體上是很清楚。這種時間不允許士兵的遺忘,也不

允許有限意義的遺忘,因為遺忘並不意謂將軼事磨擦乾淨。瀰漫的類似無法被中斷。這個遺忘只能欠缺地運作,豎立一道精神的邊界,包圍起被標明為遺忘的部份。這個邊界保持當著刪除的疤痕:你可能不記得,但是你模糊地記得某件你不記得的事情。可是,若是用耶帛哈要求的方式閱讀她的一生和她的作品,閱讀表面,但是穿透被免除連續性的時光,這些疤痕停止所有可資紀念的功能。過去不再是被覆蓋,而是片片切割。遺忘跟隨而來。遺忘絕對跟隨在後,就像是盧梭懺悔錄所寫的:為要徹底抹除前夜的的風流痕跡,他每天早上把床賣掉。「藍夾克」的故事就是要求這種瘋狂的遺忘,因為它跟類似的時刻格格不入。結果,耶帛哈的故事對蘇格拉底而言是匪夷所思,但是德勒茲卻能理解。

 

 

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